History Under the Trees 2014
History Under the Trees 2014
History Under the Trees 2014
History Under the Trees 2014
History Under the Trees 2014

Waterloo Historical Society

Welcome

Mission/Goals

The Waterloo Historical Society fosters the recognition of our region’s unique heritage and diligently encourages its preservation.

The Waterloo Historical Society documents the history of Waterloo Region, including the cities of Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge, along with the Townships of North Dumfries, Wellesley, Wilmot and Woolwich.

Westmount Neighbourhood Plaque Unveiling

Saturday, September 14, 2019, 2:00 p.m.

Parkette at the intersection of Dunbar Rd, Rusholme Rd and Union Blvd.

For more than 90 years WHS has been installing bronze plaques throughout the County/Region, telling the fascinating stories of our people and places.
The newest plaque to join those ranks celebrates and commemorates the history of the

Westmount neighbourhood and its unique position as Kitchener’s “first Detached Private Residential District”. It features the tale of local industrialist and entrepreneur Talmon Rieder, who envisioned winding streets, wide boulevards and a canopy of trees, all of which came to fruition.

The WHS thanks the City of Kitchener, Your Neighbourhood Credit Union, and the Kitchener Waterloo Community Foundation for their financial contribution, as well as the Westmount neighbourhood for their generous donations to this project.

For more details view the Invitation.

Next Meeting

Travel and Tavern-Going in Early 19th-Century Upper Canada

Tuesday, October 1, 2019, 7:30 p.m.

Victoria Park Pavilion, 80 Schneider Ave., Kitchener

In the early 1800s, travel across Upper Canada was becoming increasingly popular, particularly by stage coach. The numerous accounts of travel and recommendations for travelers which were published in this era attest to this. Many of these accounts mention travel through what would later come to be known as the Waterloo Region. Taverns, inns and public houses were established every six to eights miles along country roads to accommodate these travelers. Gaukel’s Hotel in Berlin was a prominent example, built in 1835. Public houses like Gaukle’s were usually open 24 hours a day, seven days a week to provide lodging, food, and drink for weary travelers.

Jesse Abbott, a PhD candidate at the University of Waterloo will speak to the Waterloo Historical Society about his research on the drinking aspect of travel and tavern-going. His presentation will explore the alcohol consumption of travelers and settlers in the many taverns which dotted the Upper Canadian landscape. Jesse argues that in this period, (just as today) what alcohol you drank, how you drank it, with whom, and in what quantity, and how you handled its intoxicating effects, all said something about you in colonial society. In other words, alcohol consumption informed the construction of masculine, racial, and class identities both on the road, and in public spaces.

All are welcome to attend this free lecture. Doors open at 6:30 PM and the meeting begins at 7:30 PM.

What’s New?

*September 2019 Newsletter

*Volume 106 – 2018 Patrons

Waterloo Historical Society
c/o Grace Schmidt Room, 85 Queen Street North
Kitchener ON  N2H 2H1    
whs@whs.ca

Upcoming Events

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About

Mission/Goals

The Waterloo Historical Society fosters the recognition of our region’s unique heritage and diligently encourages heritage preservation.

The Waterloo Historical Society documents the history of Waterloo Region, including the cities of Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge, along with the Townships of North Dumfries, Wellesley, Wilmot and Woolwich.

WHS Pamphlet

History

Active steps toward the establishment of a historical society in Waterloo County (now the Regional Municipality of Waterloo) were taken in 1912. With the encouragement of the Ontario Historical Society, a public meeting was held in November 1912, which resulted in a recommendation that the WHS be organized. The first meeting of the board was held on November 26, 1912.

100 years later

It has been 100 years since that modest beginning. The Society has grown to over 230 members (2009) and has a set of by-laws which govern activities carried out by the board of directors. Current activities include five public meetings each year with invited guest speakers and held in various locations within the region; since 1913, continuous publication of a volume of local history articles; quarterly newsletters; acquisition of documents and photos for WHS archives; and erecting historical plaques.100thLogo

 Affiliations

The WHS is an affiliate member of the Ontario Historical Society and a founding member of the Waterloo Regional Heritage Foundation. The WHS collaborates regularly with heritage and historical groups in the region.

Charitable status

WHS is a registered charity, under Canada Revenue Agency.

Heraldic Badge

Thanks to the generosity of James Roos Breithaupt, president of the WHS in 1997-1998, the society was granted a revised badge (based on the 1922 design by E. M. Chadwick of Toronto) by the Canadian Heraldic Authority.

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